Why Dental Implants are Growing in Popularity

Because infectious diseases are frequently transmitted via touch, hand hygiene is an important first line of defense against the spread of infections in dental practices. But bacteria and other microorganisms can survive on environmental surfaces for extended periods and be spread by touch or cross-contamination to patients, healthcare workers, and other surfaces, making surface disinfection critical. For example, MRSA can survive on surfaces anywhere from 7 days to 7 months.

Educate all team members including office and reception staff about the important role they play in preventing the spread of infection

Contaminated surfaces can re-contaminate clean hands and further contribute to the transmission of infections, meaning thorough hand hygiene and daily cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces are both imperative to preventing the spread of infections.

Dental office

Surface contamination

Compliant cleaning and disinfection of surfaces is important throughout the dental practice, including in the reception and waiting-room areas. In a recent study published in the Journal of Dental Hygiene, surface sampling from dental practices in Arizona and Missouri isolated bacteria from environmental surfaces inside and outside patient care areas. Researchers have found that other germ hot spots within reception and waiting-room areas include office door knobs, office phones, and counter tops.

Selecting the Right Products

The first step in implementing an effective environmental infection prevention strategy for your dental practice is selecting the right products. With hundreds of surface disinfectants available, it can seem challenging to identify the best products to suit your practice’s needs. It is important for dental practices to select US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered surface disinfectants designed specifically for healthcare facilities, with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms that can be transmitted via contaminated surfaces.

Ensuring Compliant Use

While selecting the correct surface disinfectants is a key part of effective infection prevention practices, establishing policies and procedures that ensure regular, compliant use of those products is also crucial to success. To ensure all team members have a clear understanding of cleaning and disinfecting protocols, we recommend the following best practices for educating team members.

Instruments closeup

As a team, review important infection prevention guidelines and OSHA regulations that pertain to your practice. Online training is available through sites, which offers free continuing education courses in infection control best practices. Develop a robust written infection control plan for your practice, with cleaning and disinfecting protocols that include cleaning responsibility grids detailing who cleans which piece of equipment or surface, with which product and how frequently.

Drinking water dilutes acids and helps cleans the teeth. It also means patients may have to go to the bathroom more often, though, so some patients avoid this approach. Considering its popularity and variety, it is important to note that bottled water may not have the ideal amount of fluoride, if any. It all depends on the source of the water. Only certain bottled water, usually for infants, generally has the proper amount of fluoride, so one should check the label.

Many Things You Can Do to Prevent Tooth Loss

Because infectious diseases are frequently transmitted via touch, hand hygiene is an important first line of defense against the spread of infections in dental practices. But bacteria and other microorganisms can survive on environmental surfaces for extended periods and be spread by touch or cross-contamination to patients, healthcare workers, and other surfaces, making surface disinfection critical. For example, MRSA can survive on surfaces anywhere from 7 days to 7 months.

Educate all team members including office and reception staff about the important role they play in preventing the spread of infection

Contaminated surfaces can re-contaminate clean hands and further contribute to the transmission of infections, meaning thorough hand hygiene and daily cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces are both imperative to preventing the spread of infections.

Dental office

Surface contamination

Compliant cleaning and disinfection of surfaces is important throughout the dental practice, including in the reception and waiting-room areas. In a recent study published in the Journal of Dental Hygiene, surface sampling from dental practices in Arizona and Missouri isolated bacteria from environmental surfaces inside and outside patient care areas. Researchers have found that other germ hot spots within reception and waiting-room areas include office door knobs, office phones, and counter tops.

Selecting the Right Products

The first step in implementing an effective environmental infection prevention strategy for your dental practice is selecting the right products. With hundreds of surface disinfectants available, it can seem challenging to identify the best products to suit your practice’s needs. It is important for dental practices to select US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered surface disinfectants designed specifically for healthcare facilities, with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms that can be transmitted via contaminated surfaces.

Ensuring Compliant Use

While selecting the correct surface disinfectants is a key part of effective infection prevention practices, establishing policies and procedures that ensure regular, compliant use of those products is also crucial to success. To ensure all team members have a clear understanding of cleaning and disinfecting protocols, we recommend the following best practices for educating team members.

Instruments closeup

As a team, review important infection prevention guidelines and OSHA regulations that pertain to your practice. Online training is available through sites, which offers free continuing education courses in infection control best practices. Develop a robust written infection control plan for your practice, with cleaning and disinfecting protocols that include cleaning responsibility grids detailing who cleans which piece of equipment or surface, with which product and how frequently.

Drinking water dilutes acids and helps cleans the teeth. It also means patients may have to go to the bathroom more often, though, so some patients avoid this approach. Considering its popularity and variety, it is important to note that bottled water may not have the ideal amount of fluoride, if any. It all depends on the source of the water. Only certain bottled water, usually for infants, generally has the proper amount of fluoride, so one should check the label.

What You Need to Know About Your Wisdom Teeth

Because infectious diseases are frequently transmitted via touch, hand hygiene is an important first line of defense against the spread of infections in dental practices. But bacteria and other microorganisms can survive on environmental surfaces for extended periods and be spread by touch or cross-contamination to patients, healthcare workers, and other surfaces, making surface disinfection critical. For example, MRSA can survive on surfaces anywhere from 7 days to 7 months.

Educate all team members including office and reception staff about the important role they play in preventing the spread of infection

Contaminated surfaces can re-contaminate clean hands and further contribute to the transmission of infections, meaning thorough hand hygiene and daily cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces are both imperative to preventing the spread of infections.

Dental office

Surface contamination

Compliant cleaning and disinfection of surfaces is important throughout the dental practice, including in the reception and waiting-room areas. In a recent study published in the Journal of Dental Hygiene, surface sampling from dental practices in Arizona and Missouri isolated bacteria from environmental surfaces inside and outside patient care areas. Researchers have found that other germ hot spots within reception and waiting-room areas include office door knobs, office phones, and counter tops.

Selecting the Right Products

The first step in implementing an effective environmental infection prevention strategy for your dental practice is selecting the right products. With hundreds of surface disinfectants available, it can seem challenging to identify the best products to suit your practice’s needs. It is important for dental practices to select US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered surface disinfectants designed specifically for healthcare facilities, with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms that can be transmitted via contaminated surfaces.

Ensuring Compliant Use

While selecting the correct surface disinfectants is a key part of effective infection prevention practices, establishing policies and procedures that ensure regular, compliant use of those products is also crucial to success. To ensure all team members have a clear understanding of cleaning and disinfecting protocols, we recommend the following best practices for educating team members.

Instruments closeup

As a team, review important infection prevention guidelines and OSHA regulations that pertain to your practice. Online training is available through sites, which offers free continuing education courses in infection control best practices. Develop a robust written infection control plan for your practice, with cleaning and disinfecting protocols that include cleaning responsibility grids detailing who cleans which piece of equipment or surface, with which product and how frequently.

Drinking water dilutes acids and helps cleans the teeth. It also means patients may have to go to the bathroom more often, though, so some patients avoid this approach. Considering its popularity and variety, it is important to note that bottled water may not have the ideal amount of fluoride, if any. It all depends on the source of the water. Only certain bottled water, usually for infants, generally has the proper amount of fluoride, so one should check the label.

5 Best Foods to Eat for Healthy Teeth and Gums

Fast fact: Did you know that nutrition and oral health are interrelated?

If you already know that and you’ve been taking proactive steps to ensure that you consume certain foods that contributes to healthy teeth and gums, then good for you. But if the link between proper nutrition and healthy gums and teeth is actually news for you, then you need to start educating yourself.

It has been mentioned a million times over and we’ll mention it again – just in case you’ve forgotten it. Yes, just like any other part of your body, your teeth and gums are essential part of your body. Everything you consume passes through your mouth (unless you are using a feeding tube, which is an entirely different story) and so it is essential that your teeth and gums are always at its healthiest.

One of the best ways to ensure that you have healthy teeth and gums is by carefully monitoring your diet. And so let’s start with the basic – which food should you consume to ensure that your pearly whites are free from disease and cavity?

Here’s a list of the five best foods to eat for healthy gums and teeth.

 

1. Cheese

Good news to all cheese lovers out there! As it turns out, your love for cheese might be the key in fighting cavities.

5 Best Foods to Eat for Healthy Gums and Teeth - Cheese - Gorgeous Smile Dental (1)

In its May/June issue, General Dentistry published a study that highlights the cavity-fighting properties of cheese. The study found that the mouth’s pH level rapidly increases after eating cheese which significantly lowers the change of developing cavities.

And while other dairy products like milk and yogurt are also known to contribute to a healthy mouth and teeth, they are not as potent as cheese in fighting cavities.

It was further revealed that certain compounds in cheese may actually stick to the tooth enamel while eating which serves as a barrier against the harmful effects of acids of teeth.

 

2. Almonds

Almonds has long been considered as a tasty and healthy snack. However, it has long garnered a bad rep because of its close association with candy and chocolates which are two of the major causes of cavities.

5 Best Foods to Eat for Healthy Gums and Teeth - Almonds - Gorgeous Smile Dental

Now here’s what you need to know about almonds – when eaten on its own, it serves as a good source of protein and calcium which leads to healthy teeth and gums. Almonds are also packed with antioxidants which helps fight bacteria in the mouth that causes things like inflammation and various periodontal diseases.

 

3. Leafy greens

How many times have you been told by your parents or doctor to eat your vegetables and leafy greens?

5 Best Foods to Eat for Healthy Gums and Teeth - Leafy Greens - Gorgeous Smile Dental

Leafy greens are almost in all “healthy food list” because they are packed with nutrients that our body needs. Do you need calcium? Eat spinach! Need to increase your B-vitamin intake? Eat some kale! Do you want to reinforce your tooth’s enamel to make it weather cavities and acid? Eat your leafy greens!

It may sometimes sound like people are exaggerating the importance of leafy greens in a person’s diet but countless studies have already proven that they really come with multiple health benefits including healthy teeth and gums.

 

4. Apples

They say “An apple a day keep the doctor away” but did you know that eating apples every day can also keep your dentist away?

5 Best Foods to Eat for Healthy Gums and Teeth - Apple - Gorgeous Smile Dental

Apples and other crunchy fruits and vegetables have high fiber and water content. The combination of fiber and fruit juice stimulates the salivary glands resulting to the increased flow of saliva inside the mouth. Saliva acts as a powerful cleanser which rids the teeth of remaining sugar and stops it before it wreaks havoc to your tooth enamel.

While apples contain high amounts of fructose or fruit sugar, the fiber and water in the fruit counteracts the harmful effect of sugar on teeth.

 

5. Carrots

Just like apples, eating carrots can also help you improve your oral health. Due to its crunchiness and richness in dietary fiber, carrots can help fight cavities.

5 Best Foods to Eat for Healthy Gums and Teeth - Carrots - Gorgeous Smile Dental

So the next time you prepare a salad, top it off with several slices of fresh carrots. Not only will it make your teeth and gums healthier, but it will also give a healthy dose of Vitamin A which helps with saliva production. And as you already know, high saliva productions is equal to healthier mouth and lower risk of tooth decay.

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Now that you know which types of food you should eat in order to have healthy teeth and gums, it’s also time that you learn which foods you should avoid. Here’s  our list of food that are wreaking havoc to your gums and teeth.

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