What to expect on first visit at Luminous Smile Dental

Booking your online appointment at Luminous Smile Dental is so easy. Just call the given numbers for our office in Newark or San Jose. After getting it done, a call or email will be delivered to you confirming the appointment in the next 24-72 hours. Another call or email will be delivered to remind the patient 24 hours before the scheduled time.

Now, if it is your first time to visit a dentist or you’re having a new dentist, expect that x-rays will be done to see the status of your teeth. Dental exams will be done as well to check other possible oral disease or symptoms.

While, those may seem a lot of work on your first visit, set aside your worry as we guarantee that Dr. Hilado is capable of making it light and fun in the process.

Give us a call now and let’s make your smile gorgeous as ever!

Oral Piercings: Risks and Safety

Art is an expression or an application of the creative skill and imagination. It can be painting, sculpting, tattoo, piercing, etc.

Art has a wide scope and one that is related to the oral health is the oral piercing. While it is a way of expressing one’s self, it has its own risks that can affect the oral health if not taken care properly.

Piercing the tongue may cause swollenness which could result in difficulty for breathing.

Here are the other risks you may deal with:

Damage fillings
Difficulty in eating, swallowing
Allergic reaction
Gum Disease
May also lead to hepatitis b and c
While we don’t discourage anyone on having oral piercing, there are things to remember so it will not be a burden sooner or later.

We recommend to get vaccines for hepatitis b and c first before undergoing piercing. It is also wise to choose shop that is clean and safe. Also follow the procedures on keeping it clean so it will not ruin your style and your health at the same time.

What Can You Do to Promote Good Dental Health

Because infectious diseases are frequently transmitted via touch, hand hygiene is an important first line of defense against the spread of infections in dental practices. But bacteria and other microorganisms can survive on environmental surfaces for extended periods and be spread by touch or cross-contamination to patients, healthcare workers, and other surfaces, making surface disinfection critical. For example, MRSA can survive on surfaces anywhere from 7 days to 7 months.

Educate all team members including office and reception staff about the important role they play in preventing the spread of infection

Contaminated surfaces can re-contaminate clean hands and further contribute to the transmission of infections, meaning thorough hand hygiene and daily cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces are both imperative to preventing the spread of infections.

Dental office

Surface contamination

Compliant cleaning and disinfection of surfaces is important throughout the dental practice, including in the reception and waiting-room areas. In a recent study published in the Journal of Dental Hygiene, surface sampling from dental practices in Arizona and Missouri isolated bacteria from environmental surfaces inside and outside patient care areas. Researchers have found that other germ hot spots within reception and waiting-room areas include office door knobs, office phones, and counter tops.

Selecting the Right Products

The first step in implementing an effective environmental infection prevention strategy for your dental practice is selecting the right products. With hundreds of surface disinfectants available, it can seem challenging to identify the best products to suit your practice’s needs. It is important for dental practices to select US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered surface disinfectants designed specifically for healthcare facilities, with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms that can be transmitted via contaminated surfaces.

Ensuring Compliant Use

While selecting the correct surface disinfectants is a key part of effective infection prevention practices, establishing policies and procedures that ensure regular, compliant use of those products is also crucial to success. To ensure all team members have a clear understanding of cleaning and disinfecting protocols, we recommend the following best practices for educating team members.

Instruments closeup

As a team, review important infection prevention guidelines and OSHA regulations that pertain to your practice. Online training is available through sites, which offers free continuing education courses in infection control best practices. Develop a robust written infection control plan for your practice, with cleaning and disinfecting protocols that include cleaning responsibility grids detailing who cleans which piece of equipment or surface, with which product and how frequently.

Drinking water dilutes acids and helps cleans the teeth. It also means patients may have to go to the bathroom more often, though, so some patients avoid this approach. Considering its popularity and variety, it is important to note that bottled water may not have the ideal amount of fluoride, if any. It all depends on the source of the water. Only certain bottled water, usually for infants, generally has the proper amount of fluoride, so one should check the label.

How to Save Your Child’s Smile with Cosmetic Dentistry

Because infectious diseases are frequently transmitted via touch, hand hygiene is an important first line of defense against the spread of infections in dental practices. But bacteria and other microorganisms can survive on environmental surfaces for extended periods and be spread by touch or cross-contamination to patients, healthcare workers, and other surfaces, making surface disinfection critical. For example, MRSA can survive on surfaces anywhere from 7 days to 7 months.

Educate all team members including office and reception staff about the important role they play in preventing the spread of infection

Contaminated surfaces can re-contaminate clean hands and further contribute to the transmission of infections, meaning thorough hand hygiene and daily cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces are both imperative to preventing the spread of infections.

Dental office

Surface contamination

Compliant cleaning and disinfection of surfaces is important throughout the dental practice, including in the reception and waiting-room areas. In a recent study published in the Journal of Dental Hygiene, surface sampling from dental practices in Arizona and Missouri isolated bacteria from environmental surfaces inside and outside patient care areas. Researchers have found that other germ hot spots within reception and waiting-room areas include office door knobs, office phones, and counter tops.

Selecting the Right Products

The first step in implementing an effective environmental infection prevention strategy for your dental practice is selecting the right products. With hundreds of surface disinfectants available, it can seem challenging to identify the best products to suit your practice’s needs. It is important for dental practices to select US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered surface disinfectants designed specifically for healthcare facilities, with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms that can be transmitted via contaminated surfaces.

Ensuring Compliant Use

While selecting the correct surface disinfectants is a key part of effective infection prevention practices, establishing policies and procedures that ensure regular, compliant use of those products is also crucial to success. To ensure all team members have a clear understanding of cleaning and disinfecting protocols, we recommend the following best practices for educating team members.

Instruments closeup

As a team, review important infection prevention guidelines and OSHA regulations that pertain to your practice. Online training is available through sites, which offers free continuing education courses in infection control best practices. Develop a robust written infection control plan for your practice, with cleaning and disinfecting protocols that include cleaning responsibility grids detailing who cleans which piece of equipment or surface, with which product and how frequently.

Drinking water dilutes acids and helps cleans the teeth. It also means patients may have to go to the bathroom more often, though, so some patients avoid this approach. Considering its popularity and variety, it is important to note that bottled water may not have the ideal amount of fluoride, if any. It all depends on the source of the water. Only certain bottled water, usually for infants, generally has the proper amount of fluoride, so one should check the label.

Braces vs Invisible Braces – What is the Difference?

Because infectious diseases are frequently transmitted via touch, hand hygiene is an important first line of defense against the spread of infections in dental practices. But bacteria and other microorganisms can survive on environmental surfaces for extended periods and be spread by touch or cross-contamination to patients, healthcare workers, and other surfaces, making surface disinfection critical. For example, MRSA can survive on surfaces anywhere from 7 days to 7 months.

Educate all team members including office and reception staff about the important role they play in preventing the spread of infection

Contaminated surfaces can re-contaminate clean hands and further contribute to the transmission of infections, meaning thorough hand hygiene and daily cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces are both imperative to preventing the spread of infections.

Dental office

Surface contamination

Compliant cleaning and disinfection of surfaces is important throughout the dental practice, including in the reception and waiting-room areas. In a recent study published in the Journal of Dental Hygiene, surface sampling from dental practices in Arizona and Missouri isolated bacteria from environmental surfaces inside and outside patient care areas. Researchers have found that other germ hot spots within reception and waiting-room areas include office door knobs, office phones, and counter tops.

Selecting the Right Products

The first step in implementing an effective environmental infection prevention strategy for your dental practice is selecting the right products. With hundreds of surface disinfectants available, it can seem challenging to identify the best products to suit your practice’s needs. It is important for dental practices to select US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered surface disinfectants designed specifically for healthcare facilities, with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms that can be transmitted via contaminated surfaces.

Ensuring Compliant Use

While selecting the correct surface disinfectants is a key part of effective infection prevention practices, establishing policies and procedures that ensure regular, compliant use of those products is also crucial to success. To ensure all team members have a clear understanding of cleaning and disinfecting protocols, we recommend the following best practices for educating team members.

Instruments closeup

As a team, review important infection prevention guidelines and OSHA regulations that pertain to your practice. Online training is available through sites, which offers free continuing education courses in infection control best practices. Develop a robust written infection control plan for your practice, with cleaning and disinfecting protocols that include cleaning responsibility grids detailing who cleans which piece of equipment or surface, with which product and how frequently.

Drinking water dilutes acids and helps cleans the teeth. It also means patients may have to go to the bathroom more often, though, so some patients avoid this approach. Considering its popularity and variety, it is important to note that bottled water may not have the ideal amount of fluoride, if any. It all depends on the source of the water. Only certain bottled water, usually for infants, generally has the proper amount of fluoride, so one should check the label.

Know About the Signs of Cavity Formation

Because infectious diseases are frequently transmitted via touch, hand hygiene is an important first line of defense against the spread of infections in dental practices. But bacteria and other microorganisms can survive on environmental surfaces for extended periods and be spread by touch or cross-contamination to patients, healthcare workers, and other surfaces, making surface disinfection critical. For example, MRSA can survive on surfaces anywhere from 7 days to 7 months.

Educate all team members including office and reception staff about the important role they play in preventing the spread of infection

Contaminated surfaces can re-contaminate clean hands and further contribute to the transmission of infections, meaning thorough hand hygiene and daily cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces are both imperative to preventing the spread of infections.

Dental office

Surface contamination

Compliant cleaning and disinfection of surfaces is important throughout the dental practice, including in the reception and waiting-room areas. In a recent study published in the Journal of Dental Hygiene, surface sampling from dental practices in Arizona and Missouri isolated bacteria from environmental surfaces inside and outside patient care areas. Researchers have found that other germ hot spots within reception and waiting-room areas include office door knobs, office phones, and counter tops.

Selecting the Right Products

The first step in implementing an effective environmental infection prevention strategy for your dental practice is selecting the right products. With hundreds of surface disinfectants available, it can seem challenging to identify the best products to suit your practice’s needs. It is important for dental practices to select US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered surface disinfectants designed specifically for healthcare facilities, with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms that can be transmitted via contaminated surfaces.

Ensuring Compliant Use

While selecting the correct surface disinfectants is a key part of effective infection prevention practices, establishing policies and procedures that ensure regular, compliant use of those products is also crucial to success. To ensure all team members have a clear understanding of cleaning and disinfecting protocols, we recommend the following best practices for educating team members.

Instruments closeup

As a team, review important infection prevention guidelines and OSHA regulations that pertain to your practice. Online training is available through sites, which offers free continuing education courses in infection control best practices. Develop a robust written infection control plan for your practice, with cleaning and disinfecting protocols that include cleaning responsibility grids detailing who cleans which piece of equipment or surface, with which product and how frequently.

Drinking water dilutes acids and helps cleans the teeth. It also means patients may have to go to the bathroom more often, though, so some patients avoid this approach. Considering its popularity and variety, it is important to note that bottled water may not have the ideal amount of fluoride, if any. It all depends on the source of the water. Only certain bottled water, usually for infants, generally has the proper amount of fluoride, so one should check the label.

Your Children Can Brush and Floss With Pleasure

Because infectious diseases are frequently transmitted via touch, hand hygiene is an important first line of defense against the spread of infections in dental practices. But bacteria and other microorganisms can survive on environmental surfaces for extended periods and be spread by touch or cross-contamination to patients, healthcare workers, and other surfaces, making surface disinfection critical. For example, MRSA can survive on surfaces anywhere from 7 days to 7 months.

Educate all team members including office and reception staff about the important role they play in preventing the spread of infection

Contaminated surfaces can re-contaminate clean hands and further contribute to the transmission of infections, meaning thorough hand hygiene and daily cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces are both imperative to preventing the spread of infections.

Dental office

Surface contamination

Compliant cleaning and disinfection of surfaces is important throughout the dental practice, including in the reception and waiting-room areas. In a recent study published in the Journal of Dental Hygiene, surface sampling from dental practices in Arizona and Missouri isolated bacteria from environmental surfaces inside and outside patient care areas. Researchers have found that other germ hot spots within reception and waiting-room areas include office door knobs, office phones, and counter tops.

Selecting the Right Products

The first step in implementing an effective environmental infection prevention strategy for your dental practice is selecting the right products. With hundreds of surface disinfectants available, it can seem challenging to identify the best products to suit your practice’s needs. It is important for dental practices to select US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered surface disinfectants designed specifically for healthcare facilities, with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms that can be transmitted via contaminated surfaces.

Ensuring Compliant Use

While selecting the correct surface disinfectants is a key part of effective infection prevention practices, establishing policies and procedures that ensure regular, compliant use of those products is also crucial to success. To ensure all team members have a clear understanding of cleaning and disinfecting protocols, we recommend the following best practices for educating team members.

Instruments closeup

As a team, review important infection prevention guidelines and OSHA regulations that pertain to your practice. Online training is available through sites, which offers free continuing education courses in infection control best practices. Develop a robust written infection control plan for your practice, with cleaning and disinfecting protocols that include cleaning responsibility grids detailing who cleans which piece of equipment or surface, with which product and how frequently.

Drinking water dilutes acids and helps cleans the teeth. It also means patients may have to go to the bathroom more often, though, so some patients avoid this approach. Considering its popularity and variety, it is important to note that bottled water may not have the ideal amount of fluoride, if any. It all depends on the source of the water. Only certain bottled water, usually for infants, generally has the proper amount of fluoride, so one should check the label.

Why Is Good Dental Equipment so Important

Because infectious diseases are frequently transmitted via touch, hand hygiene is an important first line of defense against the spread of infections in dental practices. But bacteria and other microorganisms can survive on environmental surfaces for extended periods and be spread by touch or cross-contamination to patients, healthcare workers, and other surfaces, making surface disinfection critical. For example, MRSA can survive on surfaces anywhere from 7 days to 7 months.

Educate all team members including office and reception staff about the important role they play in preventing the spread of infection

Contaminated surfaces can re-contaminate clean hands and further contribute to the transmission of infections, meaning thorough hand hygiene and daily cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces are both imperative to preventing the spread of infections.

Dental office

Surface contamination

Compliant cleaning and disinfection of surfaces is important throughout the dental practice, including in the reception and waiting-room areas. In a recent study published in the Journal of Dental Hygiene, surface sampling from dental practices in Arizona and Missouri isolated bacteria from environmental surfaces inside and outside patient care areas. Researchers have found that other germ hot spots within reception and waiting-room areas include office door knobs, office phones, and counter tops.

Selecting the Right Products

The first step in implementing an effective environmental infection prevention strategy for your dental practice is selecting the right products. With hundreds of surface disinfectants available, it can seem challenging to identify the best products to suit your practice’s needs. It is important for dental practices to select US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered surface disinfectants designed specifically for healthcare facilities, with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms that can be transmitted via contaminated surfaces.

Ensuring Compliant Use

While selecting the correct surface disinfectants is a key part of effective infection prevention practices, establishing policies and procedures that ensure regular, compliant use of those products is also crucial to success. To ensure all team members have a clear understanding of cleaning and disinfecting protocols, we recommend the following best practices for educating team members.

Instruments closeup

As a team, review important infection prevention guidelines and OSHA regulations that pertain to your practice. Online training is available through sites, which offers free continuing education courses in infection control best practices. Develop a robust written infection control plan for your practice, with cleaning and disinfecting protocols that include cleaning responsibility grids detailing who cleans which piece of equipment or surface, with which product and how frequently.

Drinking water dilutes acids and helps cleans the teeth. It also means patients may have to go to the bathroom more often, though, so some patients avoid this approach. Considering its popularity and variety, it is important to note that bottled water may not have the ideal amount of fluoride, if any. It all depends on the source of the water. Only certain bottled water, usually for infants, generally has the proper amount of fluoride, so one should check the label.

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